Luminous 14:
Discussing with light

 

Boston gets a transparent media facade    

 

Six graduate students and assistant professor Dietmar Offenhuber have created an urban light installation as part of the Northeastern University’s masters programme in information design and visualisation.

 

Students on the course “Information design for dynamic media and light” at Northeastern University designed an information display that went on their building in the heart of Boston. It told viewers about the mood on campus during finals week, transforming the data collected from participants about the campus mood into pixels of light on the physical installation, which was also designed by the students.

The students created a website interface optimised for mobile phones and coded a custom software interface for a programmable LED lighting infrastructure. They used Processing, a programming language created to enable designers and artists to develop custom code. The students’ software “We wanted to use a display medium that blends with the architecture, rather than attaches to it,” said assistant professor Dietmar Offenhuber. The class was keen to create a design that faced out toward the heart of campus, revealing hidden knowledge and intriguing passersby.

 

The students created a website interface optimised for mobile phones and coded a custom software interface for a programmable LED lighting infrastructure. They used Processing, a programming language created to enable designers and artists to develop custom code. The students’ software “We wanted to use a display medium that blends with the architecture, rather than attaches to it,” said assistant professor Dietmar Offenhuber. The class was keen to create a design that faced out toward the heart of campus, revealing hidden knowledge and intriguing passersby.
The students created a website interface optimised for mobile phones and coded a custom software interface for a programmable LED lighting infrastructure. They used Processing, a programming language created to enable designers and artists to develop custom code. The students’ software “We wanted to use a display medium that blends with the architecture, rather than attaches to it,” said assistant professor Dietmar Offenhuber. The class was keen to create a design that faced out toward the heart of campus, revealing hidden knowledge and intriguing passersby.
The students created a website interface optimised for mobile phones and coded a custom software interface for a programmable LED lighting infrastructure. They used Processing, a programming language created to enable designers and artists to develop custom code. The students’ software “We wanted to use a display medium that blends with the architecture, rather than attaches to it,” said assistant professor Dietmar Offenhuber. The class was keen to create a design that faced out toward the heart of campus, revealing hidden knowledge and intriguing passersby.

Once the software and display were created, the students promoted their project to gather the data. Taken online, through a mobile app, or with wireless buttons in front of Ryder Hall, the poll asked community members if they felt anxious, relieved, determined, excited, or exhausted. Once a vote was tallied, several LED nodes lit up on the installation. The more votes each emotion received, the larger each color-coded light cluster became.

 

The installation, named dot.vote, was made possible by the collaboration of students, instructors, and partnering companies. Philips Color Kinetics provided the LED fixtures, iColor Flex SLX, for the display, adding to the existing partnership between Northeastern and Philips Color Kinetics. This relationship stems from Northeastern’s co-op programme, in which students work full-time for six-month cycles at the Philips Color Kinetics headquarters in Burlington, MA as part of their education.

 

 

The installation, named dot.vote, was made possible by the collaboration of students, instructors, and partnering companies. Philips Color Kinetics provided the LED fixtures, iColor Flex SLX, for the display, adding to the existing partnership between Northeastern and Philips Color Kinetics. This relationship stems from Northeastern’s co-op programme, in which students work full-time for six-month cycles at the Philips Color Kinetics headquarters in Burlington, MA as part of their education.
The installation, named dot.vote, was made possible by the collaboration of students, instructors, and partnering companies. Philips Color Kinetics provided the LED fixtures, iColor Flex SLX, for the display, adding to the existing partnership between Northeastern and Philips Color Kinetics. This relationship stems from Northeastern’s co-op programme, in which students work full-time for six-month cycles at the Philips Color Kinetics headquarters in Burlington, MA as part of their education.
The installation, named dot.vote, was made possible by the collaboration of students, instructors, and partnering companies. Philips Color Kinetics provided the LED fixtures, iColor Flex SLX, for the display, adding to the existing partnership between Northeastern and Philips Color Kinetics. This relationship stems from Northeastern’s co-op programme, in which students work full-time for six-month cycles at the Philips Color Kinetics headquarters in Burlington, MA as part of their education.
The installation, named dot.vote, was made possible by the collaboration of students, instructors, and partnering companies. Philips Color Kinetics provided the LED fixtures, iColor Flex SLX, for the display, adding to the existing partnership between Northeastern and Philips Color Kinetics. This relationship stems from Northeastern’s co-op programme, in which students work full-time for six-month cycles at the Philips Color Kinetics headquarters in Burlington, MA as part of their education.
The installation, named dot.vote, was made possible by the collaboration of students, instructors, and partnering companies. Philips Color Kinetics provided the LED fixtures, iColor Flex SLX, for the display, adding to the existing partnership between Northeastern and Philips Color Kinetics. This relationship stems from Northeastern’s co-op programme, in which students work full-time for six-month cycles at the Philips Color Kinetics headquarters in Burlington, MA as part of their education.

The Processing language which the students used to create the custom software for the façade was developed specially for creative practitioners. The software is integrated with an Ethernet-based Philips Color Kinetics control system consisting of a Light System Engine and three 90 sPDS-480ca power and data supplies. Each port on the power and data supplies powers one chain of 50 LED pixels. Some 18 iColor Flex SLX chains were also used.

 

  • Photography: Philips Color Kinetics
  • Drawing: Northeastern University
You are now visiting our Global professional lighting website, visit your local website by going to the USA website